Course Descriptions

SOCIAL STUDIES

World History

Students Visit the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles

Jessica Janecek
World History Syllabus

We will begin with students examining themselves and how their viewpoints have been shaped by their experiences. We will be historians and explore the world through different timeframes, themes, and lenses. We will study the purpose of civilizations and nationalism before investigating various people, ideas, and movements from all around time and space.

U.S. History

Jessica Janecek
US History Syllabus

 We will examine US history through various lenses to create a more comprehensive picture of our nation. We will use the past to inform suggestions and pathways forward to creating a country that seeks to fulfill  the ideals outlined in the country’s founding documents.

Senior Capstone/Government and Economics

Brett Goble
Senior Capstone Syllabus
Class Introduction by Brett

In Senior Capstone students will engage in a Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) project in the context of learning and practicing concepts and skills in the subjects Government and Economics.

ENGLISH

English 9

Taylor Johnson
Class Introduction by Taylor

English 10

Dillon Martino
English 10 Syllabus

English 10 will center around students participating in thematic Literature Circle units. Literature circles are small groups of students that read a novel and related materials at the same pace while regularly meeting to discuss and write about the content, and are centered around research based practices designed to build student literacy skills.

English 11

Taylor Johnson
Class Introduction by Taylor

English 12

Annie Holub

Reading Support

Annie Holub

MATH

Algebra I

Kathy Moore

Geometry

Gabriel Reyes
Geometry Syllabus

Honors Math Night

Geometry is the branch of mathematics that is concerned with the study of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space. In this class we will familiarize ourselves with these concepts and reinforce concepts from previous classes as well. We will also strive to build a foundation for success in higher level math classes.

Algebra II

KC Engelmann
Algebra II Syllabus

The purpose of this class is to prepare students for success at the next mathematical level, Precalculus. Students will learn critical thinking skills, perseverance, problem solving, and analytical skills to be successful at the next level.

Quantitative Reasoning

KC Engelmann
Quantitative Reasoning Syllabus

The purpose of this class is to prepare students for success in life, whatever that may bring. Students will learn critical thinking skills, perseverance, problem solving, finance, and analytical skills to be successful at whatever their future holds.

The goal of this course is to help students apply mathematics in real-world situations and contexts and to deepen a student’s understanding of high school mathematics standards.  Students will use this knowledge to create a variety of projects and presentations throughout the year.

PreCalculus

Gabriel Reyes
Precalculus Syllabus

Precalculus is a course that is designed to help you prepare for higher level mathematics. It is both an introduction to new material and a reinforcement of old concepts. There are two main components to this class that will encompass all of our learning objectives.

  • Trigonometry – Put simply, trigonometry is the relationship between side lengths and angles of triangles. It is also the application of those relationships to solve for real life values. We will explore the vast strategies that can be used to solve triangles and angles, while also exploring graphs of those relationships.
  • Intermediate Algebra – We will spend half of the class reviewing and expanding on topics you may have seen in Algebra II. This will involve deepening your understanding of some concepts, and introducing related concepts.

Calculus

Gabriel Reyes
Calculus Syllabus

Calculus has a very narrow purpose, but encompasses a huge variety of techniques and topics. Your ability to work with the skills you have developed in previous classes will be essential.

  • Limits – We will look at values as they approach infinity and determine what it means to calculate never-ending values. 
  • Differentiation – This is essentially calculating the slope of a line, but we do this with curves! We will be looking at tangent lines and applying ideas through the rate of change.
  • Integrations – Integration is finding the area under a curve. We can really expand on this technique looking at graphs and rotations to also find areas.
  • Applications – We will be examining AP Calculus level problems to apply the techniques we learn about the above concepts.

Computer Coding

KC Engelmann
Computer Coding Syllabus

**This course does not count towards a math graduation credit unless approved as a personal curriculum alternative to Algebra II.**

This curriculum has been designed by the TEALS program to support computer science teachers and/or volunteer professionals teaching an introductory computer science course in a high school classroom. The curriculum is based on, and borrows heavily from, the Beauty and Joy of Computing Curriculum developed at the University of California, Berkeley. The TEALS curriculum has a heavier focus on the basic programming components of the course than BJC, sacrificing some of the advanced programming and conceptual topics that are less appropriate in an introductory high school classroom.

SCIENCE

Integrated Science

Kathy Moore

Chemistry/Physical Science

Chemistry_Physical Science Syllabus

This course uses a project-based, standards aligned curriculum framework to encompass the essential concepts of chemical and physical science. Students will analyze and explain the nature of science in the search for understanding the natural world, as well as practice the application of technology, scientific tools and critical thought skills in solving problems.  This first semester, students will formulate an answer to the questions: “How do substances combine or change (react) to make new substances? How does one characterize and explain these reactions and make predictions about them?” Chemical reactions, including rates of reactions and energy changes, can be understood by students at this level in terms of the collisions of molecules and the rearrangements of atoms. Using this expanded knowledge of chemical reactions, students are able to explain important biological and geophysical phenomena.  As scientific learners, students will make and interpret models, collect and analyze data, analyze results, draw conclusions and communicate their findings.  The crosscutting concepts of patterns, energy and matter, and stability and change are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas. In these performance expectations, students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in developing and using models, using mathematical thinking, constructing explanations, and designing solutions and to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas. Throughout the course, students will work both independently and collaboratively, with an active learner approach.  The goal for the course is for students to gain a more meaningful understanding of the world around them as well as a deeper appreciation of how science can help shed light on contemporary issues of social justice and environmental sustainability, particularly in the areas of energy production.

Biology/Environmental Science

Tyler Deeny-Martino
BiologyEnvironmental Science Syllabus

Studying biology provides a background for students to evaluate and understand new discoveries to make informed decisions in the use of scientific knowledge to benefit all living organisms. The habits developed through the study of biology  and environmental science are habits that will serve you for a lifetime.  In the era of disinformation that we find ourselves in, the ability to call on scientific thinking and to understand data is of crucial importance. Our primary objective is to build our knowledge of scientific principles in the discipline of biology and environmental science in order to use our foundation of knowledge to empower us to analyze what we are being presented in media.

Desert Youth Gardening

Jennifer Knochel
Desert Youth Gardening Syllabus

This place-based gardening course will focus on the current and relevant sustainability issues that face our Tucson Community.  Students will learn some natural history of the sonoran desert, tree and plant biology, urban agriculture, water science, and local hydrology concepts rooted in systems thinking and project-based learning.  Students will have the opportunity to use their understanding of the local environment as a model to design sustainable systems and gain experiences to become leaders in the community.  This is an applied lab science course.

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

*Students can take a world language other than Spanish at an accredited program upon the approval of the administration.

Spanish

Leslie Cho Newman
Spanish Syllabus

The goal of this class is to learn how to communicate comfortably in Spanish and to appreciate the many beautiful facets of the diverse countries where Spanish is spoken. In this class, you will participate in language rich activities and projects, and learn about the many countries where Spanish is spoken. The reading, writing, speaking and listening activities included in this class are designed with the hopes that you will come to love or continue to grow your love for the Spanish language. My great hope is that you will take away a desire to continue to learn Spanish and travel to countries where it is spoken (or anywhere else in the world for that matter), and ultimately consider yourself a Citizen of the World.

ARTS

Drama

Athena Hagen-Krause
Drama Syllabus

The purpose of this class will be to learn and practice a variety of skills and techniques related to theatre arts, live performance, and body-based storytelling. In this class we will be focusing on alternative and experimental forms of Theatre.

Studio Art

Jessica Melrose

Studio Art- Beginning Syllabus

Studio Art: Value, Texture and Techniques is a class designed for the emerging art student. We will explore the art elements: line, shape, form, value, texture and space, with an emphasis on value and spacial recognition and accuracy.

Working in primarily black and white media: graphite, charcoal, white charcoal, and pen, we will create value study drawings of topics meaningful to us using proven techniques to accurately depict images in a photo-realistic style.

We will also study professional documentation, portfolio development, and display our work for public audiences in the form of exhibitions within and outside of City High School. Finally, we will engage in reflections about our own art and artists we admire as they relate to our greater community.

By Kat Altaffer

Studio Art Intermediate Syllabus

Studio Art: Color and Composition is a class designed for art students with experience curious to explore color theory and composition. We will explore the art elements in depth: line, shape, form, value, color, texture and space, with a focus on color and color media and techniques, as well as the design principles: balance, rhythm, unity, contrast, pattern, emphasis, and movement, and when to use them and how to successfully ignore them.

Working in color media: colored pencil, oil pastel, soft pastels, and occasionally paint we will create color study drawings of topics meaningful to us using proven techniques to accurately depict images in a photo-realistic and illustrative style.

We will also study professional documentation, portfolio development, and display our work for public audiences in the form of exhibitions within and outside of City High.

Studio Art Advanced Syllabus

Studio Art: Design and purpose is a class designed for experienced art students curious to explore alternative methods of creating, developing their own style, and defining their purpose as an artist. We will use past explorations from previous courses as well as personal values, beliefs and personal and cultural inspiration to inform our work. Working in a variety of media, we will work on enhancing our portfolio and focus on professionalism in art.

We will continue to study documentation, portfolio development, and display our work for public audiences in the form of exhibitions within and outside of City High School. Finally, we will engage in reflections about our own art and artists we admire as they relate to our greater community.

Art & Community

Jessica Melrose
Art & Community Syllabus

Art & Community is a comprehensive course focused on the art and artists of Tucson, Arizona and the surrounding areas. This course includes interactive activities and studio projects representing a wide variety of artists and cultures in our community, artistic styles, and media. Students will meet and experience the work of local artists from a variety of backgrounds, visit and explore artist communities, and learn about local business that promote and support the arts. This course will give students the opportunity to review works of art from various artists, styles, and cultural groups that celebrates cultural diversity and an understanding of global views within our local Tucson community.

Audio Documentaries

Sarah Bromer
Audio Documentary Syllabus

In this class you will learn all the basic skills you need to make content for radio stations—both local and national—and to produce your own podcasts.

MakerSpace

Dillon Martino
Makerspace Syllabus

The Makerspace program at City High School is part high school woodshop and part high tech lab, where students learn design thinking, digital design skills, rapid prototyping production, basic programming and circuitry (robotics) and physical tool training that allow them to create a wide variety of projects.

GUITAR

Danny Walker

Beginning Guitar will introduce the guitar to students as well as its first techniques. Open chords, chord changing, note mapping and pentatonic scales are learned, practiced, and then synthesized in the form of a song the whole class plays.

FITNESS

Dance

Tyler Deeny-Martino
Dance Syllabus

This dance class will serve to provide students a space to simply practice something. We will talk dance culture, history, ways in which it occupies space in the white supremacy conversation, and we will consider ways that dance shows up all day, every day. Have you ever seen a baby wiggle around when music is on? We are born dancers, and we will unpack this idea over the course of the class.

Yoga

Tyler Deeny-Martino
Yoga Syllabus

The purpose of this class is to provide the student with foundations of a safe and useful yoga practice.

 

OTHER ELECTIVES

Computer Coding

KC Engelmann
Computer Coding Syllabus

**This course does not count towards a math graduation credit unless approved as a personal curriculum alternative to Algebra II.**

This curriculum has been designed by the TEALS program to support computer science teachers and/or volunteer professionals teaching an introductory computer science course in a high school classroom. The curriculum is based on, and borrows heavily from, the Beauty and Joy of Computing Curriculum developed at the University of California, Berkeley. The TEALS curriculum has a heavier focus on the basic programming components of the course than BJC, sacrificing some of the advanced programming and conceptual topics that are less appropriate in an introductory high school classroom.